Viewing Room

American Icons


Legacy

Vibrant and uplifting, American Icons showcases abstract expressionist, pop-art and street-art works amongst others, by pivotal American artists that heralded the onset of 21 st century contemporary art.
Leaving their mark in art history and revolutionizing the modern art world, these diverse and experimental New World artists have pushed boundaries forging forward, reimagining the meaning of sculpture and painting, exploiting taboo subject matters and social commentaries, appropriating popular imagery and giving them a new lease of life. These American icons share a certain clarity, boldness, grandeur of scale and incredible confidence.
Tom Wesselmann
Sunset Nudes is most certainly Wesselmann's most important group of paintings since the iconic Great American Nudes of the 1960s. This series (2002-2004) recalls the highly provocative, sexed-up blondes of the earlier series in a refined and flawless light. Swaths of bold colours are tightly contained within contiguous lines to create a smooth and seductive composition.
Tom Wesselmann, Sunset Nude (Variation #1), 2002
oil on canvas, 170,2 x 193 cm (67 x 76 in)
Available
George Condo, Nu assis, 2008
oil on linen, 132,1 x 106,9 cm (52 x 42.1 in)
Available
George Condo
Fascinated with the greats of Art History and with Picasso a key touchstone and influence, Condo refers to his work as "psychological Cubism".
" Picasso painted a violin from four different perspectives at one moment. I do the same. with psychological states."
George Condo
Keith Haring
Haring's works capture the artist's invented version of reality that defined his artistic career offering a deeply personal and critically important narrative. If many of his creations appear celebratory and playful, he was a politically active and socially conscious artist, interested in reflecting and responding to the cultural climate in which he lived.
Keith Haring, Untitled, 1988
acrylic on canvas, 122 x 91,5 cm (48 x 36 in)
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Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
Tom Wesselmann, Nude with Bouquet and Stockings, 1985
Enamel on laser-cut steel, 84,4 x 218,4 cm (33.2 x 86 in)
Available
"I have always used drawings as a necessary part of my paintings and my paintings are almost always an outgrowth of drawing."
Tom Wesselmann
Andy Warhol, Kimiko Powers, 1972
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 101,6 x 101,6 cm (40 x 40 in)
Available
Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Ivette and Lurdes), 1975
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 35,6 x 28 cm (14 x 11 in)
Available
Warhol's intense fascination with stardom, immortality through celebrity-status and beauty drew him to iconic figures from the one-of-a-kind Marilyn Monroe to the personalities of the political sphere like Jackie Kennedy. Warhol began his Marilyn portraits the day of her death in 1962 and his images of Jackie Kennedy were created just days after the assassination of her husband in 1963. As an artist/marketeer, he keenly perceived social trends and sorted the extraordinary events and personalities from the ordinary.
Andy Warhol, Jackie, 1964
Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50,8 x 40,6 cm (20 x 16 in)
Sold
Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
Alex Katz, Roses on Blue, 2002
oil on canvas, 122 x 381 cm (48 x 150 in)
Available
Alex Katz utilizes bold simplicity, heightened colour, and economy of line to create stylized landscapes or portraits that are defined by their hard-edge and flatness of form.
"I like to make an image that is so simple you can't avoid it, and so complicated you can't figure it out."
Robert Indiana, Love (Gold faces - Red sides), 1966-2002
Polychrome aluminium, 182,9 x 182,9 cm (72 x 72 in)
Available
Robert Indiana’s
archetypal stacked LOVE composition, with its bold serif lettering of VE stacked beneath the L and off-kilter O, is one of the most ubiquitous works of art of the century.
“Some people like to paint trees. I like to paint love. I find it more meaningful than painting trees.”
 
Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
"The drawings which I do have very little in common with drawings in the classical sense as they developed during the Renaissance, and the drawings that imitate life or make a lifelike impression.
My drawings do not try to imitate life, they try to create life, to invent life."
Keith Haring
Keith Haring, Untitled (May 24-83)
Acrylic on paper, 183 x 381 cm (72 x 150 in)
Available
Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
Frank Stella, Niveau 1A, 2001
Painted cast metal, 154,9 x 182,9 x 45,7 cm (61 x 72 x 18 in)
Available
Frank Stella
intends for his work to have the same visual impact as cinematic performance. His works are unpredictable – full of surprising twists and turns.
“It seems to me that there’s some hint of this kind of chaotic, ambiguous figuration in painting, with its inherent three-dimensional illusionism in constant tension with its two-dimensional surfaces.”
Frank Stella
George Condo, Whistler's Father, 2019
Acrylic and oil sick on canvas, 193 x 188 cm (76 x 74 in)
Available
"Picasso painted a violin from four different prespectives at one moment. I do the same with psychological states."
George Condo
Sam Francis, Untitled, 1973
Acrylic on paper, 116,2 x 78,7 cm (45.7 x 31 in)
Available
Sam Francis’s
work conveys a captivating balance between chaos and order, light and dark, reverberating with the rhythmic movement of the artist. He skillfully manages to combine luscious colours, exuberant application of thinned-out paint, and significantly, a serenely poetic deployment of negative space.
"Color is born of the interpenetration of light and dark."
Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
"There was a time when I realized that the central focal point of portraiture did not have to be representational in any way. You don't need to paint the body to show the truth about a character. All you need is the head and the hands."
George Condo
George Condo, Untitled, 2015
graphite on paper, 76,8 x 111,8 cm (30.2 x 44 in)
Available
Tom Wesselmann, Study for Claire, 1992
Liquitex on cardboard, 60 x 48 cm (23.6 x 18.9 in)
Available
In 1957 Wesselmann had met fellow art student Claire Selley, the model for many of his works, who would later become his wife.
Alex Katz, Corinne, 2006
oil on canvas, 122 x 244 cm (48 x 96 in)
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Installation view, American Icons, Legacy, Opera Gallery ©
Keith Haring, For Honda, 1987
White marker on black paper, 62,5 x 48 cm (24.6 x 18.9 in)
Available
"Art is for everybody."
"The drawings which I do have very little in common with drawings in the classical sense as they developed during the Renaissance, and the drawings that imitate life or make a lifelike impression. My drawings do not try to imitate life, the try to create life, to invent life."
Keith Haring
Keith Haring, Untitled # 16, 1988
sumi ink on paper, 76,2 x 101,6 cm (30 x 40 in)
Available
Kenny Scharf, Blobztec, 2018
oil on Linen with Powder Coated, 121,9 x 121,9 cm (48 x 48 in)
Available
Kenny Scharf
 self-described ”Pop Surrealist," Scharf employs a range of techniques, media and allusions to create hallucinatory worlds filled with floating donuts, cartoon characters and bright-coloured, often-anthropomorphic blobs. His paintings bridge the gap between fine art and popular culture.
“One very important and guiding principle to my work is to reach out beyond the elitist boundaries of fine art and connect to popular culture through my art. My personal ambition has always been to live the example. I believe the artist has a social responsibility to engage others in a thought process that ultimately brings art into everyday life thereby enhancing the quality of our experience.”
Kenny Scharf